IBM Offers Clients Greener Cloud Options

IBM's new data center technique identifies underutilized nodes in the system for optimal workload distribution.

IBM recently patented a new technological method that allows data center operators to significantly decrease the environmental impact of their cloud computing data center infrastructure designs.

The new technique involves the ability to reorganize workloads within cloud computing services and migrate certain tasks to lower-powered or underutilized systems, according to the company. IBM's patent for the dispersal strategy states that when the system receives a request to complete a task from a node in the network, the technology identifies nodes that have the resources to perform the request. In this way, workload demands can be distributed to certain nodes based on environmental impact ratings, the patent stated. 

Company representatives stated that in the current growing cloud-based IT market, organizations most often select one-size-fits-all infrastructure designs without considering the best options for data center sustainability.

IBM master inventor and patent co-inventor Keith Walker said the new method provides an avenue for service providers to better manage their facilities in an effective, environmentally conscious way.

"The efficient, distributed cloud computing model has made it possible for people to bank, shop, trade stocks and do many other things online, but the massive data centers that enable these apps can include many thousands of energy-consuming systems," Walker said.

Green cloud computing possibilities
IBM's new technique aims to improve the inner workings of data center facilities that support cloud systems. This development builds upon a technology that already offers customers opportunities to go green.

According to a recent study by Microsoft Europe and the Global e-Sustainability Initiative, cloud computing systems will help decrease greenhouse gas emissions by 95 percent, as much of the technology is supported by data center structures instead of housed on-site by individual companies. This could total more than $2.2 billion in energy savings, stated Environmental Leader, a daily trade publication specializing in energy and environmental news.

IBM's solution will further boost the environmental benefits of a cloud computing design for data center sustainability.